Pre Treatment Guidelines

What to do Prior to Treatment:

Fill out the patient intake forms as completely as you can.     Do a three day diet journal of what you eat, drink and snack on, ideally on the back of the last page of your patient forms.    Bring your current supplements  with you.

Eat something before coming in for a treatment.   And plan to drink water after treatment as we will have released a lot of cellular toxins with your treatment and you'll want to flush these through.

Cost of Treatments?

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A first visit lasts between an hour and a half to 2 hours, includes treatment and the charge is $110.00.   Follow up visits are typically an hour and the charge is $75.00.    If front and back treatments are requested, there will be an additional charge based on time spent.

An herbal consult without treatment is $70.00.  Herbal formulas are made specifically for the individual either in powder form or can be ordered in capsule form, or classical formulas may be utilized.

There is a 5 percent discount for a package purchace of 5 visits and a 10% discount for a package purchace of 10 treatments, however the first visit is not discounted.

Acupuncture facelifts are a seperate treatment by themselves, unless otherwise arranged.     The charge is $85.00 for a treatment that lasts about an hour.    

A twenty four hour cancellation notice is required, except in emergencies, otherwise missed appointments are charged.



What is acupuncture and Oriental medicine?

 

Acupuncture is a holistic system of healing, dating back more than 2500 years in China. Acupuncture points are areas of designated electrical sensitivity shown to be effective in the treatment of specific health problems. Perhaps best known for pain relief, traditional acupuncture is used to maintain health and treat a wide range of illnesses. It focuses on the patient's overall well-being, rather than treating only specific, isolated symptoms. The basic premise of all Oriental medicine is that health is dependent on the body's life energy, "qi" (pronounced "chee"), flowing in a smooth and balanced way through the network of meridians (channels) connecting all major organs. Qi consists of equal and opposite qualities, known as yin and yang. When the qi is disturbed, these become unbalanced, resulting in illness. The flow of qi can be disturbed by any number of factors, such as anxiety, stress, poor nutrition, weather conditions, hereditary, infections, toxins and trauma. The acupuncturist restores the qi's balance by inserting fine sterilized needles into the channels of energy, stimulating the body's own natural healing mechanisms. As a holistic method, the principal aim of acupuncture is to restore equilibrium between a person's physical, emotional and spiritual aspects.

 

 

The skill of the acupuncturist lies in his/her ability to make a traditional diagnosis from what is often a complex pattern of disharmony. The nature of the disharmony is unique to each individual, and with traditional acupuncture, is treated as such with a personalized treatment plan. Your practitioner will make a Chinese medical diagnosis based on a thorough examination and consultation. 

 


 


How does acupuncture work?

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Acupuncture achieves the desired results by stimulating specific points near or on the surface of the skin - acupuncture points - that have the ability to alter biochemical and physiological conditions in the body. Because acupuncture points are designated areas of electrical sensitivity, inserting needles at these points stimulates sensory receptors. This in turn stimulates nerves that transmit impulses to the hypothalamic-pituitary system in the brain. The hypothalamus-pituitary glands are responsible for releasing neurotransmitters and endorphins, the body's natural pain-killing hormones (thought to be some 200 times more potent than morphine). Endorphins play a significant role in the hormonal system, which is why acupuncture is effective in treating back pain, arthritis, PMS and infertility. The substances released as a result of acupuncture relax the body, and also regulate serotonin in the brain, which affects emotional states. Other physiological effects include increased circulation, decreased inflammation, relief of muscle spasms and increased T-cell count, which supports the immune system.

Western science posits that acupuncture triggers three primary mechanisms in the body:

  • Activation of opioid systems: Research has found that several types of pain-reducing opioids may be released into the central nervous system during acupuncture.
  • Changes in brain chemistry: Studies have shown that acupuncture may alter brain chemistry by altering the way in which neurotransmitters and neurohormones are released. Acupuncture has also been documented to affect sensation and involuntary body functions, such as immune reactions and processes involved in regulating blood pressure, blood flow and body temperature.
  • Changes in blood flow: Acupuncture and Oriental medicine affects the circulation of blood to the affected area, which helps to remove pain-causing chemicals and restore normal function.


What are the most commonly treated ailments?

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Acupuncture is recognized by the National Institute of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) to be effective in the treatment of a wide variety of medical problems. The following are some of the more common conditions treatable by Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture, as outlined by the WHO.

Upper Respiratory Tract

  • Acute sinusitis
  • Acute rhinitis
  • Common Cold
  • Acute tonsillitis

Respiratory System

  • Acute bronchitis
  • Bronchial asthma (most effective in children and in patients without complicating diseases)

Disorders of the Eye

  • Acute conjunctivitis
  • Central retinitis
  • Myopia (in children)
  • Cataract (without complications)

Disorders of the Mouth

  • Toothache, post-extraction pain
  • Gingivitis
  • Acute and chronic pharyngitis

Gastro-intestinal Disorders

  • Spasms of esophagus and cardia
  • Hiccough
  • Gastroptosis
  • Acute and chronic gastritis
  • Gastric hyperacidity
  • Chronic duodenal ulcer (pain relief)
  • Acute duodenal ulcer (without complications)
  • Acute and chronic colitis
  • Acute bacillary dysentery
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Paralytic ileus

Neurological and Musculo-skeletal Disorders

  • Headache and migraine
  • Trigeminal neuralgia
  • Facial palsy (early stage, i.e., within three to six months)
  • Pareses following a stroke
  • Peripheral neuropathies
  • Sequelae of poliomyelitis (early stage, i.e., within six months)
  • Meniere's disease
  • Neurogenic bladder dysfunction
  • Nocturnal enuresis
  • Intercostal neuralgia
  • Cervicobrachial syndrome
  • "Frozen shoulder," "tennis elbow"
  • Sciatica
  • Low back pain
  • Osteoarthritis

The most common ailments presented to acupuncturists in the U.S. are pain-related conditions. However, as the public becomes more educated about acupuncture and Oriental medicine, they are seeking help for a number of other conditions, with good results. These include:

Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat Disorders

  • Sinusitis
  • Sore throat
  • Hay fever
  • Earache
  • Nerve deafness
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Dizziness
  • Poor eyesight

Circulatory Disorders

  • High blood pressure
  • Angina pectoris
  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Anemia

Gastrointestinal Disorders

  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Spastic colon
  • Colitis
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Food allergies
  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Hemorrhoids

Gynecological Genitourinary Disorders

  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
  • Irregular, heavy or painful menstruation
  • Endometriosis
  • Menopause
  • Fibroids
  • Chronic bladder infection
  • Complications in pregnancy
  • Morning sickness
  • Kidney stones
  • Impotence
  • Infertility in men and women
  • Sexual dysfunction

Immune Disorders

  • Candida
  • Chronic fatigue
  • HIV and AIDS
  • Epstein Barr virus
  • Allergies
  • Lupus
  • MS
  • Hepatitis

Addiction

  • Smoking
  • Drugs
  • Alcohol

Emotional and Psychological Disorders

  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Stress

Musculoskeletal and Neurological Disorders

  • Arthritis
  • Neuralgia
  • Sciatica
  • Back pain
  • Bursitis
  • Tendonitis
  • Stiff neck
  • Bell's palsy
  • Trigeminal neuralgia
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Stroke
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Polio
  • Sprains
  • Muscle spasms
  • Shingles

Respiratory Disorders

  • Asthma
  • Emphysema
  • Bronchitis
  • Colds and flu

Miscellaneous

  • Chemotherapy/radiation side effects
  • Diabetes
  • Dermatological disorders
  • Weight control


How old is acupuncture?

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Acupuncture has been used by the Chinese and other East Asian peoples to restore and maintain good health for about 2500 years. The first known medical account of acupuncture is found in The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine, which dates from the Han Dynasty (206 BCE to 220 ACE). Originally needles were fashioned from stone, and later bronze, gold and silver.



What Are Your Cancellation Policies?

A 24 hour cancellation notice is requested.   No shows and no calls are charged at hourly rates, unless due to an emergency.